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Imported From Epistula Personal

Ghost Story

Apparently the owners of this house had been seeing images and hearing
voices for quite a while.
They did some research and found that a lady once lived in the house who
lost her husband during the civil war. Legend says that she used to sit at
the table and look across the fields in anticipation of her loved one
returning home. He never came back.

They say she still waits. They caught this photo (using digital imaging and
sound) of what they claim to be her.

This one is wild and a little spooky once you find the ghost in the picture.
It took me about 20 seconds to find it, but when you do, it just stands out
like one of those optical illusions.

To save you some time, concentrate around the table and sort of towards the
window. Also, if you have volume, turn it as loud as possible and you can
hear some faint murmurings which they say is the ghost talking.

The Room

Via Andrew Cardwell

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epistula Imported From Epistula

All Hallow's Eve

Happy Halloween, world. As well as this temporary new theme, there was supposed to be a new story up today, but last night I spent three hours trying to fix our server, so it didn’t happen. Gah

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Imported From Epistula weblog

Comments Redux

Sarabian has replied to my previous rant. My issue is with the phrase

I think comments are losing their purpose as the weblogging world progresses, using tools such as referrers, pingbacks and trackbacks.

Of which I saw the implication as “comments are being, and should be, replaced by backlinks”, if that isn’t what he intended to say, then I aplogise for aiming my rant at him. The point is, somewhere buried in the text, that I’m not talking to webloggers, not primarily, nor even mostly. Most of the people who come here do not have a weblog of any kind, although some have a livejournal or something, but not a medium where they respond to such things, and so saying the above is roughly saying “You can’t talk to me if you arn’t in my gang”. ie, the gang of people with the time and inclination to write weblogs.

Finally, and possibly more importantly, people are far more likely to use comments than email.

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Imported From Epistula Personal

Down down, deep linkin' and down.

URLs are important. Most companies are beginning to realise this fact, and that just because they have a website (http://www.thisismycoolcompany.8m.freeserve.co.notreally.flash.fuq) could not be good enough. They need a DOT COM!!!! Hah, I have one, it’s nothing special. (Why do I have a dot com? because Aquarionic Designs was once my trading name, and will be again. What’ll happen to the site then, I’m not sure). But URLs go deeper than that, Being able to understand what a link means (/archive/2002/10/30/, for example, is pretty useful) means that users can – if they want – bypass your carefully constructed navigation system because they already know where to go. There are bad aspects to this, particularly if you are relying on things on a public medium remaining secret, as Intentia did, you may get irritated with the system. There are other points, of course. The fact that Moveable Type puts it’s comments form in a place where a script – as well as a person – knows where it is without even scanning leads to Comment Spamming. This has lead to many weighty opinions on the subject of should there be comments on weblogs? Or have we moved beyond that, into the realms of Pingback and Trackback as Sarabian suggests?

Sod that. That’s elitism, it’s insulting, and it’s the very thing I blasted LiveJournal for a few months back – the idea that only people in their little community have the right to comment on pages. I can discuss Sarabian’s entry without using his commenting system, and he can know about it by the magic of Pingback. But say Mad Bull linked to me, discussing my entry. I don’t read his weblog (I just pulled it out of the random blogsnob box to the left), and I can’t trust my referer logs anymore. And that’s the people who have weblogs, or diaries of some kind, what about the people who leave comments that by no means would warrant a full entry in their own mouthpiece, even if they have one. There is a large difference between “Comment”, which is what I allow, and “Response”, which is what things like ping/trackback are designed for.

Some weblogs don’t do comments, Mark being a prime example, because they don’t fit with the style of the blog, or because the author doesn’t want them, but claiming some evolutionary advantage in not allowing people who don’t have their own weblog to comment is not good.

Categories
Imported From Epistula Personal

On the future

I’ve been working on a todo list for Epistula, Things I want to impliment, the article is here, I’d appreciate comments and suggestions, people 🙂

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epistula Imported From Epistula

Todo

Stuff I’d like to do to Epistula:

The New Commenting System
Semi-done now, New structure and migratory scripts in place, I just have to rewrite addcomments.php and fetch_comments() to do it right before I make it live, this will include some kind of monitoring system to stop be being comment spammed, probably by watching IPs.

(Added 2002-10-30, Updated 2002-10-30)
2Kewl
The link management part of Epistula, Or rather it’s sequel.

(Added 2002-10-30, Updated 2002-10-30)
The new Entry structure
Modified structure to use epoch instead of timestamp. (Gives me more freedom of date-selectors)

(Added 2002-10-30, Updated 2002-10-30)
The new reviews system
Split it out from articles completely and make it fit with everything else.

(Added 2002-10-30, Updated 2002-10-30)
The category system

Currently, I have four different category systems (Links, Articles, Entries), these will get folded in to one.

(Added 2002-10-30, Updated 2002-10-30)

Vignette-style content generation
Vignette works by only generating pages when people ask for them. Basically, Epistula will generate caches of pages. When the cache is invalid (by someone adding a comment to it, for example), it’s deleted and the next time the page is loaded, a new cache is generated.
The general point is that instead of generating a full page every time (It now takes the server half a second to generate the front page of Aquarionics. Not bad, but if I get slashdotted I’m in serious trouble within seconds, So Epistula will be rebuilt so that doesn’t happen, first in PHP and later in C and Perl (Perl doing front-end generation, C accessing databases and managing caches).
Probably.

(Added 2002-10-30, Updated 2002-10-30)
Rewrite of the Gallery System
To give me sub galleries, categories (see above), and automatically generated thumbnails

(Added 2002-10-30, Updated 2002-10-30)
The great rewrite
Scrap everything, rewrite using mod_rewrite so I can give everything a look & feel without having to panic about include paths and other such nonsense, but do it in a way that makes every existing URL remain valid. Nobody said I took the easy route out of anything 🙂

(Added 2002-10-30, Updated 2002-10-30)
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Imported From Epistula weblog

1984 == 2002

London’s Police force release a new poster

Are you afraid of the cameras?

Categories
Imported From Epistula weblog

Blogdex2.0

Coolness, Blogdex 2.0 has gone live

Via Mark

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epistula Imported From Epistula

New Feature

Normally, Epistula shows the latest 5 entries. This is no longer true. Instead, if there are more than 5 entries in the last day (Like today) it will show all that day’s entries, OR the last five, if were less than five.
Neat 🙂

Categories
Imported From Epistula weblog

Believe

I Used To Believe (via The Antigeek) is a website dedicated to things children used to believe, but know better now. It’s interesting to know that some of the odd things I believed when I was five are the same as other people did…

I used to believe that the world would end in 1970. I just couldn’t imagine the year being anything other than 1960-something (the something corresponding to my age…). Even when I warmed up to the possibility that we might survive the decade (which I allowed only after someone convinced me that I really had been born in 1959 instead of 1960), 2000 gave me the creeps; but I figured by then I’d be an old, old, guy approaching 40, doing nothing with my time except lying about on the sofa like my granddad always did maybe watching TV because that’s all old guys did, and it wouldn’t matter anymore…

Oh, and anyone who hasn’t experienced Acts of Gord should do so. Now