Categories
Computer Games

Games For Windows Live Undead, Marketplace Edition

“Age of Empires III is available for 10p”
Interesting. That’s probably worthwhile.
“On Games For Windows marketplace”
Oh.
Ah well. Lets give it a go.
  1. Go to site. “10p or 10 points” Well, I have 200 points, use those.
  2. Sign in to MSN
  3. Enter credit card details. What? Oh. Can’t I use my points?
  4. Fine then. 10p to the Visa. May your transaction fees never be overcome.
  5. Yes. yes. Yes. Yes. Download.
  6. … That’s the games for windows client? Don’t I already have that?
  7. Fine. New version. I agree, I agree, I agree. Launch.
  8. Yes, download that new game.
  9. What? Yes of course install it. Why would I… nevermind. Yes, install it.
  10. What damned product key?
  11. Oh, right, there’s a “Game Keys” option on the panel. Yes, that one. Yes, that one. Copy, Paste.
  12. … I can’t paste it in? I have to type it? But it’s *there* in electronic format! It’s in your own damned client!
  13. Fine. Type.
  14. Correct. Enter.
  15. I agree
  16. I agree.
  17. Yes, first born, whatever.
  18. Play.
  19. No, that’s launching a window of the directory you installed to. I note with interest that’s not the hard drive I’d have prefered.
  20. Play.
  21. … Your play button actually launches the directory window, doesn’t it? Oh well done.
  22. Age3.exe
  23. Ensemble Studios Presents A Microsoft Game Studios Game Of Nvidia: The Way It’s Meant To Be Played
  24. Now my tea’s cold. Woe.
Categories
computing

Windows 7

My work machine runs Ubuntu, as does my netbook. But my primary desktop is used mostly for games and web-browsing, so it tends to be in Windows. Chrome is currently my browser of choice when not developing (because I can start it, check my email and close it again in the time it takes Firefox to load). Microsoft sent me an email – along with most of the rest of the world – saying I could try the Windows 7 RC for free for a year, so I decided to give it a shot. Mostly because Windows 7 has DirectX 11, and I wanted to see if LOTRO‘s support was shiny.

Now, last time I attempted a Windows 7 install, it didn’t go so well. (This article contains occasional Naughty Words).

This time it worked perfectly. It installed cleanly, recognised all my hardware, and everything’s working fine. LOTRO found its DirectX 10 mode, and looks shinier, and the interface is snappy and responsive, and has stolen just enough from OS X to be shiny without being a ripoff. The “gadgets” bar is off by default, and it Just Works.

Which is a shame, because the other article was a lot more fun to write.